Business

The Summer Of Extreme Weather, GM’s Plans For One Million EVs And Turning Trash Into Cash

This week’s Current Climate, which every Saturday brings you the latest news about the business of sustainability. Sign up to get it in your inbox every week.

Earlier this week, the city of St. Louis saw over 8 inches of rain overnight, breaking a record that had stood since 1915, which caused flash floods and road closures. In Kentucky, rains have caused flooding severe enough to cause over a dozen deaths and the President has declared it a “major disaster.” Meanwhile, heat waves in other parts of the country have sparked wildfires and temperatures got so high that it’s killing livestock in Kansas.

This extreme weather is likely to go on, especially the increased heat, as the climate changes over the coming years and decades. Heat is already the number one cause of weather related deaths in the U.S., meteorologist and Forbes contributor Jim Foerster writes. But in addition to the human cost, extreme heat is also a drag on the country’s economic outlook. Foerster notes that extreme heat quantifiably reduces productivity and GDP. But more importantly: much of the world wasn’t built for a hotter climate.

“These challenges with extreme temperatures are likely not going away, so business leaders will need to be prepared for ongoing challenges with these temperatures,” Foerster writes. “Not only with the direct – and critical – effects of high temperatures such as health and safety, but also the secondary effects that affect business operations and productivity.”

Special thanks to Forbes Fellow Ariyana Griffin for her assistance in this week’s newsletter.


The Big Read

How Bill Gates-Backed Republic Services Turns Trash Into Big Cash

Garbage was the ultimate commodity business until a young McKinsey consultant saw how Republic Services could transform itself into a profit machine by pricing all sorts of trash at a premium. Now he’s CEO of the outperforming junk giant. Read more here.


Discoveries And Innovations

The CDC announced that a potentially deadly bacteria, Burkholderia pseudomallei, has been detected in soil and water samples in the U.S. for the first time.

Planting trees to reduce carbon dioxide is great, but if you want to reduce carbon dioxide in marine environments, you need to plant seagrass.

Climate change is causing the brunt of extinctions among birds to be borne by unique species that live in particular ecological systems.

Engineers have created a biodegradable battery partially made out of paper, which they hope could be used to reduce e-waste from items like smart packaging.


Sustainability Deals Of The Week

Gravity Climate, which has launched a software platform focused on helping industrial customers manage their carbon emission goals, announced a $5 million seed round from Eclipse Ventures.

Lithium and battery technology company EnergyX announced a $450 million funding agreement from investment group Global Emerging Markets, with an eye to furthering its efforts towards commercialization of its technology.

The EU organization that provides Europe’s contribution to the international fusion experiment, Fusion For Energy, announced a multi-million contract with architecture firm IDOM and industrial construction company Alsymex to develop the systems that will keep the fusion project’s plasma heated enough to provide sustainable power.

Clean energy company Intersect Power has ordered 2.4 GW worth of First Solar’s high-performance photovoltaic solar modules, with a timeframe of delivery between 2024-2026.


On The Horizon

The 2022 UN Climate Change Conference will be held in Egypt this November, which will provide the continent of Africa a spotlight to show off how it could serve as the renewable energy powerhouse of the future.


What Else We’re Reading This Week

The scientists who switched focus to fight climate change (Nature)

The Big Business of Burying Carbon (Wired)

Designers Want to Fix the Big Ugly Problem With Solar Panels (Bloomberg)



Green Transportation Update

Things are heating up in the U.S. battery production space as companies including Tesla, General Motors, Ford, Hyundai and Volkswagen race to make more lithium-ion cells at domestic plants. Redwood Materials, led by Tesla cofounder JB Straubel, aims to help build that large-scale battery production base with a massive $3.5 billion plant in Nevada to make the cathodes they need to supply millions of vehicles–using some of the recycled material it’s already producing from old batteries and electronics.


The Big Transportation Story

General Motors Strikes Deals To Ensure EV Battery Production As Q2 Falls

Speaking of batteries, General Motors has big plans to grow its EV business and to do that it needs lots and lots of those power devices. CEO Mary Barra says it’s secured supply deals that ensure it can hit a goal of building a million electric vehicles annually by 2025. Read more here.



More Green Transportation News

Wireless EV Charging Company WiTricity Wins Major Investments, Partnership As Cord-Free Charging Expands

Concept EV, Drive-By-Wire Van Aims To Shake Up Last-Mile Delivery Industry

Future Tech Watch: Sono Motors’ Sion EV Is Covered In Solar Panels To Soak Up Free Power

EV Drivers Love That Quick Acceleration – And That’s Forcing Companies Like Pirelli To Rethink Tire Design

Driving And Charging The Ford Mustang Mach-E GT In The Redwoods


For More Sustainability Coverage, Click Here.


Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button